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Group Show: Amit, Brown, Newman

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Friday, Jul 20 - Aug 11, 2018


Categories
  • Exhibitions
  • Location
    ARC Gallery
    District
    West Side
    Address
    1463 W. Chicago Ave. 60642
    Telephone
    773-252-2232
    Reminder
    Download to calendar

    Granite Amit: The Movement for the Liberation of the Narrative 

    Opening  Fri.  July 20,  6-9pm

    Granite Palombo (Amit ) is an activist, interdisciplinary artist who exhibited nationally and internationally. She initiates outreach projects with previously incarcerated clients, youth at risk, and with residents of a domestic violence shelter. Integrating her training as a therapist she exhibits and performs with her clients in professional art venues. She was ordained as a Rabbi at RSI in New York in June 2016, focusing on Jewish mysticism and healing.

    Palombo’s (Amit) work has a strong textual component and her installations and performances uses often projected animations and projections of real-time interactive animation reflecting the dancers’ movements. Her narratives concern social issues, which she connects to broader more general questions of humanity and the human condition.

     

    Tehilla Newman

    Opening  Fri.  July 20,  6-9pm

    While my legal name is Heidi, mostly everyone calls me Tehilla: my Hebrew name which means “Praise Gd with song.” I love to sing, yet also praise the Gd of my understanding with visual art. I use clay, (MotherEarth Herself) and while I work from live nude models, I sculpt the neshama  (soul/essence) rather than the physical body. People who see and touch them in person comment on the “Kabbalstic” healing energy emanating & vibrating from within them. I welcome your touch and feedback.

     

    Monica J. Brown: Mythical Memory/Abstract Lens

    Opening  Fri.  July 20,  6-9pm

    “My current work is an exploration of memory, history and personal mythology. I believe that gathering the stories from the past, knowing them, and sharing them is a means to healing learned dysfunctional patterns as well as embracing inherited strengths and gifts.  I have been exploring the stories of my maternal ancestors with an inquiry into that which is passed down through generations of women (epigenetics).

    What does it mean to remember? Memory is the fabric of life experience. Our autobiographical memories are the stories that we tell ourselves about ourselves. Though life events may be experienced with others, memory is a solo journey, as it a reproduction of events filtered through personal perception and an interpretation of past experiences. Beyond nostalgia, memory holds an essence of our awareness of ourselves. It is a template for how we perceive relationships, and informs our interactions inside relationships.

    Memory is an abstraction. It holds our entire history, but how much of that is our “real” story? And what stories do we tell ourselves about this story? Which stories do we own and which ones own us? And how do we break free of those that don’t serve our greatest good? And which ones are there for us to uncover/recover/discover for the healing our ancestors/progeny/selves?”

     

    Top image: Granit Amit