NU DOCS Program 3: STRUCTURES (2019)

Friday, Jun 14, 2019 6:15 – 9 pm

Northwestern University
40 Arts Circle Dr.
Evanston, IL 60208

NU Docs 3: STRUCTURES

A night of boundary-pushing films that interrogate the repercussions of large-scale oppression and loss of agency in various parts of the world. These traumas range from repression by religious institutions, to systemic racial violence, to crimes against spiritual freedom, to all-out war. Each work, diverse in both form and filmmaker, provides insight into the darkest side of humanity, while suggesting paths toward freedom to believe, to question, and to rise up. #NUDOCS2019

Post Q&A moderated by TBA. 

FILMS

Children of the Moon (Dir. Will Klein, 17m)
Growing up in America (in a cult).

I Dream of Vietnam (Dir. Jiayu Yang, 16m)
A Chinese filmmaker embarks on a journey to the Sino-Vietnamese border where she confronts her own liminality through the country’s long legacy of intrusion.

Nineteen Ninety-Nine (1999) (Dir. Ziyi Yang, 12m)
Victimized by the brutal consequences of China’s systemic crackdown on spiritual freedom, two women retell their undocumented memories of torture and mental surveillance, in search of compassionate survival.

The Color of Skin (Dir. Jessica Scott, 20m)
The short documentary The Color of Skin explores and highlights the hatred, bigotry, discrimination and injustices against African-Americans committed by white men.

Each night of NU Docs features a selection of new short documentaries, with the opportunity to engage with the makers and celebrate their accomplishments. Discover a new generation who are making exciting films that tackle a wide range of topics. Previous thesis films have gone on to play such prestigious festivals as Locarno, Slamdance, New Directors/New Films, AFI Docs, IDFA, et al.

Doors open at 6:15pm, light refreshments served during pre-screening reception.

Sponsored in part by Northwestern’s School of Communication, The Department of Radio-TV-Film, Jane Steiner Hoffman and Michael Hoffman, and The Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art.